Richland Student Media

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Richland Student Media

Richland Student Media

Dallas


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Richland Chronicle 5/07/24
Richland Chronicle 5/07/24

Hip-hop, round 2: You die, you lose

Part three in the series “Welcome to hip-hop, round 2: The next 50 years.”
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Staff Illustration/Aislyn Smith

Welcome to the world of hip-hop, where emcees battle for a large fan base and to stay relevant for a chance to become a billionaire. As times change, the strategies of positioning to survive the chaos of the music industry changes as well.
Whether you are mainstream or underground, the fruits of hip-hop can be in abundance. Musicians should be mindful of the old saying, “Everything glitter ain’t gold.” A true lifestyle of being health conscious might allow someone to taste their sweet victory longer as a king or queen dominating or having a chance to dominate. Hip-hop faces this reality or pass the mic by force, not by choice. One of the biggest questions from the legends to the youth is, “Will you all learn from our mistakes and grow?” as we reflect on the history of hip-hop, what we consider was the first phase, the first 50 years.
Round 2 is the next 50 years of hip-hop. Some of our greatest musicians died at what some would consider as entertainment age. Entertainment age is between 50 and 60 years old. As one of the “Kings of Dallas Under-ground Music”, BKA “Confetti Da Reala Soulja,” went blind at 43 in the first 50 years of hip-hop. Appearing to be on a high-speed chase, to add to the evidence of health-conscious awareness is much needed. Facing the reality of passing the mic by force.
As Round 2 continues, hip-hop gets old-er and so do the legends. When you look at the rap culture, we try to focus on who’s at jeopardy. Who lacks being proactive with health-conscious information? The conclusion is everybody. Some would point the finger at the youth first, but we understand in their delusional minds they think they are invincible. Seriously, we have a heart knowing that the youth are young with understanding life. Nobody gets a pass on not being proactive if they are health conscious. Life will put everything in check. It’s time to wise up hip-hop.
According to the Bloomberg Health index, the United States ranks 34 in healthiest countries while other health organizations say it’s around 38 out of 169 nations. Some critics say our health care system ranks dead last. Hip-hop, your health is your true wealth hands down.
Lord forbid this becomes a musician reality after someone reads this. Seriously, let’s reflect on your whole life journey right before you die, and those pearly gates open to let you in. You were dynamic and iconic as a rapper. You enjoyed all the fruits of hip-hop. Now you are about to pleasantly and respectfully pass the mic to your ops. As the youth of hip-hop would say, it’s time for your ops to enjoy the throne by technicality. The angel of death comes and says, “No questions asked, pass the mic.” While the world of hip-hop screams, “Next!”

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